How to Text (or Talk To) Someone You're Worried is Feeling Suicidal
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When someone is feeling like hurting themselves, they don’t always respond honestly to direct questions like “Are you feeling suicidal?” The Crisis Text Line encourages an “expression of care” way of asking questions that can help reduce suicidal thoughts: https://mashable.com/article/how-to-ask-about-suicide-crisis-text-line/?fbclid=IwAR34_xGkFLrVjAj29vQBznVHi2L-GZUzcGtWQUc9V3diYHc4NPF-KR19h_Q#

Amelia Sauter
The Best Book on Teenage Girls

If you parent a teenage girl - or even a gender non-conforming teen or teenage boy - Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood by Lisa Damour, PhD is filled with excellent, practical, helpful, and thoughtful advice and ideas on what your teen is going through as they move through their teenage years and how you can support and guide them effectively. I highly recommend this book to parents and anyone who works with teens of any gender.

Amelia Sauter
Enough Abuse Tompkins
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The Advocacy Center is holding a free two-day Training of Trainers on January 10 and 11 for Enough Abuse Tompkins. Enough Abuse Tompkins is a peer-facilitated educational program for adults in Tompkins County. Skilled community members who have completed an intensive training process lead interactive free workshops that focus on understanding sexual behaviors in children, sexual abuser behaviors and grooming tactics, and the social conditions that perpetuate abuse.

To apply to be a workshop facilitator, click here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfDP6IhOqTZhnkid_UB4PghuxvSGebVKurTk2OLa3LaVM9uOA/viewform

To learn more about Enough Abuse Tompkins, visit this website:

http://www.theadvocacycenter.org/prevention/enough-abuse/#

Amelia Sauter
I'm Sorry I Didn't Get It

This is a wonderful letter by Lindsay Norris. She’s an oncology nurse who thought she understood exactly what her patients were going through - until she was diagnosed with cancer herself.

I spent seven years accompanying people through palliative care and hospice as a social worker, but I’d never really experienced cancer in my own life. When my wife, Leah, was diagnosed with life-threatening breast cancer in 2015, I realized how little I knew despite all of my experience as a social worker. I still don’t know what it’s like to be the one with the diagnosis. But by accompanying Leah day and night, I gained a much better sense of what people are dealing with 24 hours a day when they have a serious illness. And I definitely learned first hand how frightened and overwhelmed a caregiver can feel.

Lindsay Norris does a wonderful job of describing being the patient instead of the professional in her blog post here:

https://bit.ly/2GoByXs

And so you don’t have to worry: Leah is 3 years out from her cancer diagnosis after surgery and chemotherapy so far is cancer-free!

Amelia Sauter